Boeing 777X delays may affect Emirates fleet plans: Clark

This post was originally published on this site

https://i-invdn-com.akamaized.net/trkd-images/LYNXMPEF9G23W_L.jpg

By Laurence Frost

LONDON (Reuters) – Delivery delays to Boeing’s (N:) 777X jetliner are holding back Emirates’ growth and could partially affect the Gulf carrier’s broader requirements for wide-body aircraft, airline President Tim Clark said on Thursday.

Dubai-based Emirates has 150 of the 350-400-seat model on order, of which eight were originally slated for delivery next year, and has yet to firm up orders for 40 of Boeing’s mid-size 787 jets.

The world’s largest operator of long-haul aircraft is also in talks to complete an order for 70 Airbus jets, with both sets of negotiations in focus ahead of the Dubai Airshow in November.

Boeing suspended load testing on its new 777X in September, when media reports said a cargo door failed a ground test. There have also been issues with its General Electric (N:) GE9X engine, the largest ever produced for an airliner.

The plane was originally due to reach Emirates, its first operator and biggest customer, in June 2020.

In an interview, Clark said Emirates no longer expects to receive the first 777X before “April or the second quarter” of the following year.

“That has conditioned everything else,” he told Reuters on the sidelines of the Airlines 2050 conference in London.

“First of all I want to know when the thing’s going to come,” he added. “Our fleet plans are very much driven by when these aircraft are going to be delivered to us.”

The airline’s capacity growth is being held back by the delivery delays and will resume only “when I get some visibility on all this”, Clark said.

Boeing was not immediately available for comment.

In September, Chief Executive Dennis Muilenburg said it was “working towards entry into service (of the 777X) by the end of 2020,” subject to the availability of engines.

There has been speculation that Emirates could defer or reduce 777X orders, or else downgrade some to the smaller 787.

Clark told the Seattle Times in June that Emirates was discussing a combination of 777Xs and 787s that would preserve overall numbers but substitute some jets and spread other deliveries over a longer period.

Clark reiterated on Thursday that Emirates was also examining the 777X and 787 orders as part of a broader fleet review, and not purely due to delays. But he added no major decisions could be taken without more clarity over deliveries.

Planemakers already face pressure over late deliveries of smaller aircraft, with Boeing’s 737 MAX grounded following two accidents and Airbus’s A320neo hit by industrial delays. But the November air show is expected to test airlines’ leverage in negotiations for the newest big jets like the 777X.

While Boeing tries to finalise its 787 deal, Airbus will be hoping to complete an order for 40 broadly similar A330neo and 30 A350 jets which Emirates tentatively ordered in February when Airbus decided to halt production of its flagship A380.

Asked about the status of new Airbus orders, Clark stressed the importance of extremely high reliability and added, “Until they can contract for that, we’re not going to take them.”

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.

Add Comment